Key Economic Indicators

CIBC publishes two documents that provide a good summary of key economic indicators for US and Canada:

The Economist publishes weekly indicators.

BMO publishes three reports:

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Venture Capital Statistics

United States

VC Investments Q3 2009 – MoneyTree – National Data
VC Investments Q3 2009 – MoneyTree – Regional Data
VC Investments Q3 2009 – MoneyTree – Top Deals
VC Investments Q3 2009 – MoneyTree – Charts
VC Investments Q3 2009 – MoneyTree – Press Release
Corporate Venture Capital Group Investment Analysis 1995 to Q1 2009

Economic Impact of Venture Capital

Venture funding stalls in third quarter

Canada

Q2 2009 VC Industry Overview
Q2 2009 PE Industry Overview
Québec’s Venture Capital Market in Q2 2009

The Impact of Venture Capital in Canada on Economy, Jobs and Innovation

Venture capital deals plummet in Q3

US at 17.5% Unemployed and Underemployed

The New York Times published  an article on November 6th that talked to the point that the “broader measure of unemployment stands at 17.5%“.

The 17.5% rate includes the officially unemployed, who have looked for work in the last four weeks. It also includes discouraged workers, who have looked in the past year, as well as millions of part-time workers who want to be working full time.

The actual rate of underemployment may be even higher since the official government definitions and measures of unemployment miss other underemployment cases.

According to wikipedia, in economics, the term underemployment has three different distinct meanings and applications. All meanings involve a situation in which a person is working, unlike unemployment, where a person who is searching for work cannot find a job.   Underemployment can mean:

  1. The employment of workers with high skill levels in low-wage jobs that do not require such abilities, for example a trained medical doctor who works as a taxi driver.
  2. “Involuntary part-time” workers — workers who could (and would like to) be working for a full work-week but can only find part-time work. By extension, the term is also used in regional planning to describe regions where economic activity rates are unusually low, due to a lack of job opportunities, training opportunities, or due to a lack of services such as childcare and public transportation.
  3. “Overstaffing” or “hidden unemployment”, the practice in which businesses or entire economies employ workers who are not fully occupied—for example, workers currently not being used to produce goods or services due to legal or social restrictions or because the work is highly seasonal.

Former U.S. labour secretary Robert Reich has said that he believes the Unofficial U.S. jobless rate could be as high as 20%.

Related:

US States With More then 10% Unemployment


Michigan 15.20%
Rhode Island 12.40%
Oregon 12.20%
South Carolina 12.10%
Nevada 12%
California 11.60%
Ohio 11.10%
North Carolina 11%
District of Columbia 10.90%
Kentucky 10.90%
Tennessee 10.80%
Indiana 10.70%
Florida 10.60%
Illinois 10.30%
Alabama 10.10%
Georgia 10.10%

Ref: Is Your State’s Unemployment System in Danger?

50 most populous metro areas ranked by job postings per capita

Rankings Second Quarter 2009

50 most populous metro areas ranked by job postings per capita.

Rank (Last Qtr Rank) Metropolitian Area Job Postings Per 1000 People
1 (1) Washington, DC 133
2 (2) Baltimore, MD 90
3 (3) San Jose, CA 80
4 (7) Austin, TX 56
5 (6) Hartford, CT 54
6 (9) Seattle, WA 53
7 (8) Salt Lake City, UT 52
8 (11) Denver, CO 50
9 (5) Boston, MA 49
10 (4) Las Vegas, NV 49
11 (15) Charlotte, NC 49
12 (10) San Francisco, CA 47
13 (12) Milwaukee, WI 41
14 (30) Atlanta, GA 40
15 (13) Cincinnati, OH 39
16 (14) Oklahoma City, OK 39
17 (22) Orlando, FL 37
18 (23) Richmond, VA 37
19 (24) Jacksonville, FL 36
20 (16) Dallas, TX 36
21 (18) Phoenix, AZ 36
22 (19) Columbus, OH 36
23 (21) San Antonio, TX 36
24 (20) Tampa, FL 35
25 (31) Kansas City, MO 34
26 (34) Indianapolis, IN 34
27 (33) Sacramento, CA 34
28 (17) San Diego, CA 33
29 (27) Philadelphia, PA 33
30 (35) Nashville, TN 33
31 (29) St. Paul, MN 33
32 (26) Louisville, KY 33
33 (40) New Orleans, LA 32
34 (25) Houston, TX 32
35 (28) Cleveland, OH 32
36 (37) Providence, RI 31
37 (36) Pittsburgh, PA 31
38 (38) Memphis, TN 30
39 (32) Virginia Beach, VA 30
40 (44) St. Louis, MO 30
41 (39) Portland, OR 30
42 (42) New York, NY 28
43 (41) Birmingham, AL 28
44 (46) Chicago, IL 27
45 (43) Riverside, CA 26
46 (45) Los Angeles, CA 24
47 (47) Buffalo, NY 24
48 (48) Rochester, NY 19
49 (49) Miami, FL 17
50 (50) Detroit, MI 15

From http://www.indeed.com/jobtrends.jsp

Recession Proof Businesses – US Gun Shops

According to Reuters, in the first two months of 2009, around 2.5 million Americans bought guns, a 26 percent increase over the same period in 2008. Gun dealers report this rise in sales to be a consequence of fear of social unrest as the ailing economy pushes the newly destitute deeper into misery.

The Orlando Sentinel’s also reports that gun dealers are experiencing shortages of bullets

Some say it began with the election of President Barack Obama. Others say it’s about the economic downturn or fear of crime. Whatever the reasons, ammunition has been selling like plywood and bottled water in the days before a hurricane.

Eleanor Duckwall’s blog on the nationwide ammunition shortage that has hit the U.S.  provides a comprehensive review of the various possible reasons for the ammunition shortage, which may include:

  • An increase in the size and number of paramilitary police units
  • An increase in the use of “patrol carbines” in law enforcement
  • Fears of draconian gun and ammunitions restrictions
  • Economic instability

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